Medical Disaster Response in the Philippines

Special Feature by Kasper Nybo Photography for AMEN Group.

 

Today, November 8. 2014, marks the one year anniversary of typhoon Haiyan making landfall as one of the strongest and most deadly typhoons ever recorded in the Philippines. As part of our feature story from the disaster (read more), Kasper was embedded with a US medical team for 48 hours – from they touched down in the middle of a disaster zone to having a fully functional medical clinic running. These images have never been publicly released before.

WARNING: This series contains graphic images that some viewers may find disturbing.
 

Village of Dulag, Leyte Province, Philippines. Fishermen and coconut farmers find their homebase destroyed by sustained wind speeds of 250 km/t and a violent storm surge. A US medical team move in to the local medical center to start their operation.

Village of Dulag, Leyte Province, Philippines. Fishermen and coconut farmers find their homebase destroyed by sustained wind speeds of 250 km/t and a violent storm surge. A US medical team move in to the local medical center to start their operation.

Today, november 8. 2014, marks the one year anniversary of typhoon haiyan making landfall as one of the strongest and most deadly typhoons ever recorded in the philippines. As part of my feature story from the disaster, i was embedded with a us medical team for 48 hours – from they touched down in the middle of a disaster zone to having a fully functional medical clinic running. These images have never been publicly released before.

WARNING: This series contains graphic images that some viewers may find disturbing.

November 25, 2013, Dulag, Philippines. After an almost three-week marathon shift – being on call 24/7 – the local doctor (left) is exhausted as he is finally relieved from duty by a large team of American doctors.

November 25, 2013, Dulag, Philippines. After an almost three-week marathon shift – being on call 24/7 – the local doctor (left) is exhausted as he is finally relieved from duty by a large team of American doctors.

The structure of the clinic has survived the typhoon and have now been cleared from mud and rubble. Water is on its way from a Red Cross project and locals are working on getting generators up and running.

The structure of the clinic has survived the typhoon and have now been cleared from mud and rubble. Water is on its way from a Red Cross project and locals are working on getting generators up and running.

As the rumor of the arrival of the medical team spreads, crowds are flooding the waiting areas and long lines form on the streets.

As the rumor of the arrival of the medical team spreads, crowds are flooding the waiting areas and long lines form on the streets.

Without electricity or running water dental care is reduced to damage control and pain relief in the village of Dulag, Leyte Province, Philippines

Without electricity or running water dental care is reduced to damage control and pain relief in the village of Dulag, Leyte Province, Philippines

A woman looks away as her hand is stitched by the doctors. Village of Dulag, Leyte Province, Philippines

A woman looks away as her hand is stitched by the doctors. Village of Dulag, Leyte Province, Philippines

Deep cuts in hands and feet are very common as rubble is cleared with little or no protection at all. This woman’s hand is stitched up in the light from a window and two flashlights

Deep cuts in hands and feet are very common as rubble is cleared with little or no protection at all. This woman’s hand is stitched up in the light from a window and two flashlights

A young girl is having her lungs checked. Village of Dulag, Leyte Province, Philippines

A young girl is having her lungs checked. Village of Dulag, Leyte Province, Philippines

Inflammation is washed out from a deep wound in this mans foot. Village of Dulag, Leyte Province, Philippines

Inflammation is washed out from a deep wound in this mans foot. Village of Dulag, Leyte Province, Philippines

In the makeshift ER a father protects his son from seeing the bloody hand of the other boy who has just been carried in with a bad cut.

In the makeshift ER a father protects his son from seeing the bloody hand of the other boy who has just been carried in with a bad cut.

The wound is washed repeatedly before being stitched up. The young boy is biting his shirt and screaming in pain.

The wound is washed repeatedly before being stitched up. The young boy is biting his shirt and screaming in pain.

More flashlights are brought in and the wound is closed. By nothing short of a miracle the critical nerves of the hand are undamaged.

More flashlights are brought in and the wound is closed. By nothing short of a miracle the critical nerves of the hand are undamaged.

With the doctors working on his hand, the young boys older brother steps outside for a minute. Village of Dulag, Leyte Province, Philippines

With the doctors working on his hand, the young boys older brother steps outside for a minute. Village of Dulag, Leyte Province, Philippines

Update, December 2014.

MILLIONS RETURN HOME BUT CHALLENGES REMAIN

Of the 4.1 million people uprooted by Typhoon Haiyan, most have returned home or have relocated in the last 12 months. The Philippines government estimates that 5,000 families consisting of 20,000 people remain in 56 formal displacement sites across typhoon-affected areas, living in tented camps, transitional shelters and one evacuation centre.

“One year on, the country has made impressive achievements in recovery,” said UNHCR’s Representative in the Philippines, Bernard Kerblat. “This shows the power of the collective action between the government and humanitarian actors on the ground, and the indomitable will of the communities and survivors to rise above the tragedy.”

However some 20,000 people are still displaced in temporary sites. A recent protection assessment found that they face a number of protection risks and residual humanitarian issues, including housing, land and property issues, physical security, water sanitation and hygiene. As the search for permanent sites continues, local authorities have provided temporary shelters in and around Tacloban and in Eastern Samar. The road to recovery is not complete yet, and much help is still needed.

 

Images by Kasper Nybo Photography. We work in the no-man’s land between narrative observation and visual storytelling, capturing authenticity and creating no-nonsense visual communication. We believe in the power of originality and honest stories across our line of work in editorial, commercial, artistic and humanitarian photography. Get in touch and let us know how we can help you deliver stronger stories! For bookings or questions click above. If you want to read more about us, click right here.